The Forbidden Topic: Depression In The Bible



The Forbidden Topic: Depression In The Bible


Do you know someone that struggles with depression?  Do you know the signs of depression? Most importantly, did you know that you can be saved and still suffer from depression? Surprisingly, the church today aren't able to answer most of these.  Depression is real. Don't allow even church folks to deny the help you may need if you suffer from depression. They can be the worst when it comes to mental illness. You can’t just pray away these things. It takes prayer, professional help, and support to get through a mental illness such as depression.

Did you know that the word "depression" was demonstrated throughout the Bible. Though the Bible doesn’t use the word “depression” except in a few translations and verses, it’s often referenced by other similar words, such as “downcast,” “brokenhearted,” “troubled,” “miserable,” “despairing,” and “mourning,” among others. Throughout the Word, there are a number of stories about godly, influential men and women of faith, who struggled and battled through dark times of hopelessness and depression. 

David was troubled and battled deep despair. 

In many of the Psalms, he writes of his anguish, loneliness, fear of the enemy, his heart-cry over sin, and the guilt he struggled with because of it. We also see his huge grief in the loss of his sons in 2 Samuel 12:15-23 and 18:33. In other places, David’s honesty with his own weaknesses gives hope to us who struggle today:“My guilt has overwhelmed me like a burden too heavy to bear.” Ps. 38:4 “Why are you downcast, O my soul? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God.” Ps. 42:11


Elijah was discouraged, weary, and afraid. 

After great spiritual victories over the prophets of Baal, this mighty man of God feared and ran for his life, far away from the threats of Jezebel. And there in the desert, he sat down and prayed, defeated and worn: “I have had enough Lord, he said. Take my life, I am not better than my ancestors.” 1 Kings 19:4

Jonah was angry and wanted to run away.

 After God called Jonah to go to Nineveh to preach to the people, he fled as far away as could. And after a storm at sea, being swallowed by a giant fish, and then being saved and given a second chance, he obeyed. He preached God’s message to the people of Nineveh. God’s mercy reached out to all people who turned to Him. But instead of rejoicing, Jonah got mad: “Now O Lord, take away my life, for it is better for me to die than to live.” Jonah 4:3. And even after God reached out to Jonah again with great compassion, he responded, “…I am angry enough to die.” Jonah 4:9.

Job suffered through great loss, devastation, and physical illness. 

This righteous man of God lost literally everything. So great was his suffering and tragedy that even his own wife said, “Are you still holding on to your integrity? Curse God and die!” Job 2:9. Though Job maintained his faithfulness to God throughout his life, he still struggled deeply through the trenches of pain: “Why did I not perish at birth, and die as I came from the womb?” Job 3:11.“I have no peace, no quietness, I have no rest, but only turmoil.” Job 3:26. “I loathe my very life, therefore I will give free rein to my complaint and speak out in the bitterness of my soul.” Job 10:1. “Terrors overwhelm me…my life ebbs away, days of suffering grip me. Night pierces my bones, my gnawing pains never rest.” Job 30:15-17.

Moses was grieved over the sin of his people. 

In his feelings of anger and betrayal from his own people, Moses, as a leader, was about ready to quit. He came down from his mountaintop experience with God, commandments in hand, only to find the Israelites in complete chaos and sin. His heart-cry to God on their behalf was desperate: “But now, please forgive their sin – but if not, then blot me out of the book you have written.” Ex. 32:32

Jeremiah wrestled with great loneliness, feelings of defeat, and insecurity. 

Also known as the weeping prophet, Jeremiah suffered from constant rejection by the people he loved and reached out to. God had called him to preach, yet forbidden him to marry and have children. He lived alone, he ministered alone, he was poor, ridiculed, and rejected by his people. In the midst of it, he displayed great spiritual faith and strength, and yet we also see his honesty as he wrestled with despair and a great sense of failure: “Cursed be the day I was born…why did I ever come out of the womb to see trouble and sorrow and to end my days in shame?” Jer. 20:14,18



Jesus Himself was deeply anguished over what lay before Him. 

He knew what was to come. He knew that God had called him to a journey of great suffering; he knew what must happen in order for us to live truly free. Our Savior and Lord was willing to pay the price on our behalf, but it wasn’t an easy road. Isaiah prophesied that Christ would be "a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief." Is. 53:3. We can be assured, that in whatever we face, Jesus understands our weakness and suffering, our greatest times of temptation and despair, because he too traveled that road, yet without sin. In the garden, through the night, Jesus prayed, all alone, calling out to His Father, asking Him for another way: “And He said to them, 'My soul is deeply grieved to the point of death; remain here and keep watch.' And He went a little beyond them, and fell to the ground and began to pray that if it were possible, the hour might pass Him by. And He was saying, 'Abba! Father! All things are possible for You; remove this cup from Me; yet not what I will, but what You will.'" Mark 14:34-36. The Bible says that so great was his anguish, that he sweat “drops of blood.” Luke 22:44





The Forbidden Topic: Depression In The Bible The Forbidden Topic: Depression In The Bible Reviewed by The Preying Narcissist Staff on 5:57:00 AM Rating: 5

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